In Search of a Title

The story of one journal's quest for a sensible font size


November 13th, 2014

(no subject) @ 06:10 pm

I think I am tired of this stupid world.

I think I am frustrated at this job thing. I think I have given up on it and I just pretend otherwise. I am good at what I can do, and I am better at it than other people, and things I can't do I learn quickly too. But that doesn't matter because I can't do the stupid things like applications any more, or interviews. I just want to curl up and cry. Not a good thing at an interview. There's nothing here anyway. I should move, but I go the museum 2 days a week. They're good for mean. I mean, there I am unstressed and happy and confident. If I move, I lose that and that is not a good thing. Not sure they understand how bad that would be. They don't understand much. They say "Can you do admin?" "Can you do bookkeeping." Of course I can do admin, but then I am on edge all the time and cry all the time and forget what day it is. And bookkeeping is worse because there are numbers and they're not always the numbers or in the right place. And no wants me to do admin anyway.

I think sometimes about other things I could do. I have ideas but not on my own. Too hard. Everything is too hard. So I keep ideas to myself and think about them. That's all

I think this writing is too hard. I do it, of course, but that's not working. I don't know why :( I write things I like to read. I buy books or get books from the library, and they're full of people I don't care about doing things I don't care about, and I've probably read about before. Sometimes I read historical-type books because it seems I should like them, and I like to write some, but they make me think the author has done their research by reading over novels, and then adding in some cool things they've found elsewhere. I don't much enjoy most books I try to read, and no one wants to read mine.

I think I have lots of ideas I want to share and talk about, about history things mostly, but I don't know how or where too, or it's too hard. I see people who talking about things that they think they know about, but they don't. I know these things they don't know, but it's not much use, if there's no one to listen.

I think I don't post here much now because it takes too long to do photo posts. Really it takes hours to find, edit, upload, put in order, write bits. For one person and their cat to read. Or I look at photos from holidays and I edit, and cull ad cull and still there are 30 for one topic. Too many, so no point. I think of things I can write about but who wants to read about my stupid ideas.

I think I am supposed to be studying at uni. I did enrol in one unit at the beginning of the year, and it sent anxiety and depression sky-high. Tension, and not sleeping, and sleeping too much, and crap, I couldn't do assignments, I couldn't get the words out of my head onto paper, because I knew I'd get told it was "wrong". I did write one essay by writing about things I'd seen or ideas I'd had, but of course that didn't have enough footnotes so it was wrong. Always wrong. No learning going on. Just finding words other people have used, and arranging them so they might match someone else's preconceived ideas of what should be there. Hateful process. I thought about seeing if I could do it by research instead, but it's too hard to contact them because they'll say I don't have enough of this and that. I feel lost and alone there, even though it's online study, Still all alone and lost.

And also I try to join clubs, or volunteer to help at events. This usually turns out to be a bad idea. Mostly I get ignored, and then I get upset. When they had the Tony Robinson thing at the beginning of the year, I offered to help because at the museum so it seemed OK, but then I just ended up standing in the courtyard crying, so I came home. I've stopped trying to take part in things now. Is easier.

I think I have spent a lot of this year crying :(

 

November 12th, 2014

How the Good News came to Harefield @ 12:00 am

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How the Good News came to Harefield

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From the final issue of the Harefield Park Boomerang, a little newspaper produced for the patients of Harefield House Hospital under the editorship of Mrs Theodora Roscoe. Poems, photos (of home), funny stories and anecdotes, the usual stuff you find in newsletters produced for/by soldiers. Although this, also in the final issue, is a bit different:
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November 9th, 2014

Day the 9th wants to do updates @ 06:16 pm

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I finished story #3 today. My total for the day was 6506, which is 6 over the required daily minimum so I am having the rest of the evening off.

It's an odd little story. First person present, and the narrator's voice is... distinctive. I have a feeling this is the one that will be demanding I rewrite it come November. All 25000 words of it. Still, that's the length it wants to be (and it'll double on rewrite). It was an exercise in how little I need to actually know about the setting to write something historical. Not much, is the answer and I think that's a good way to do it. Now I know what I need to focus any research on.

Of course, this means I now need something else to start writing.
*puts brain in ideas mode*
*turns on radio*
 

November 4th, 2014

Day the 4th didn't want updates @ 09:25 pm

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Image2 <-- me

Which is good, because now the daily target drops by 6000 words.

Last lines:
Soon it went away. All the shouting. All the voices. Just leaving me with the peace of the grave. Although there shouldn't be rocks sticking into me in a grave. That wasn't fair.
"Will?"
Another shout, but not a shout. A voice raised but not too loud. What did a dead man have to do to get peace?
"Will? Where are you?"
The bushes rustled.
"How in hell did you get in there?"
I knew that voice, but he couldn't be here.
 

November 3rd, 2014

Day the 3rd has no updates yet @ 08:36 pm

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Word wars required for 10K words: 17

Plodding along. Slow going and story isn't cooperating. Had a nap earlier, and ended up sleeping for 4 hours. Didn't need a nap, but fingers did. So they were better after a four hour break but that was a lot of writing time wasted. Still, just reached 40K. I'll do some more tonight though. The more I do tonight, the less I have to do tomorrow. I through tomorrow I had an appointment in the morning which meant I'd be away from home for most of the day, but it's actually next week, which I should have remember being the 11th. So I'll just be away for the afternoon. That's OK. Probably good even.

I should add a note here to remind myself that starting at midnight on 1st November is actually a good idea. Rather than worrying about how this is going to work and if it's going to work, I went to bed having already started, which relieved the worry. Also weird dreams about story while half asleep had brain in right place to continue writing when I woke up.
 

November 2nd, 2014

Day the 2nd finally ends @ 10:24 pm

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Total word cont: 30154
Clues about what MC #1 will do next: 0
Words written on stupid story #2 that is going where it shouldn't and might not be salvageable: 4554
Very tired and totally lacking in any enthusiasm peoples: 1
Cups of tea: 2
Hot cups of tea: 0.2
 

Day the 2nd proceeds onwards @ 04:31 pm

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Halfway marks reached: 1

Actually, that's the only number that matters right now :)
 

Day the 2nd, middle of @ 01:19 pm

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20K's reached: 1
Fingers's sore: 4
Clever ideas for what to write next: 0
Times in a row AIMP3 has played the Night Chicago Died: 3 so far
Cups of tea: 0.5
 

Day the 2nd @ 10:18 am

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Words written before breakfast: 1100
Times I've thought I don't want to do this: 2
Legs hurt while asleep: 1
Cups of tea: 0
 

November 1st, 2014

Day the 1st is very long @ 08:28 pm

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"Personal best word count for the day" records beaten: 1

Not sure how that happened. I thought I was going badly today but on checking previous years, my best for one day was 13872 on Day 3 of 2012. Now I'm sitting on 14061 with an hour or so still to go tonight. Weird. Admittedly, I'm trying to get as much done today as I can because Tuesday won't be a very productive day but I feel better now.

Plots that have come to a sudden halt: 1

That is more of a problem. Something might come to me over night.

Last line:
I left the watch house, with the intent of finding Ed Davis. This meant visiting every pub in the town. Sometimes I rather like my job.
 

Day the 1st still @ 06:40 pm

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Quotas met: 1
Enthusiasm: -1
Ideas about what happens next: -1
Cups of tea: 1.6

Wrong sort of tea :|
 

Day the 1st @ 05:06 pm

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Enthusiasm: 0
Ideas for what to write next: 0
Cups of tea: 1

*looks at user icon*
I see the problem!
 

October 30th, 2014

Parrawa, parrawa @ 08:53 pm

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I wasn't sure about sharing photos from this exhibition. A lot of it is audio-visual, and much of its effectiveness comes from the placement of the elements within the space, and both of those get lost in photos. Against that, it might also be of interest to those who never/rarely get down to Hobart to actually see it.

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October 25th, 2014

Models, models and more models. @ 09:33 pm



Today I went to the Scale Model Expo and took some photos! But as it was inside, most of the photos are not very good :( These are the better ones, and Troy's planes are at the end.
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October 9th, 2014

Sheep at the show @ 07:17 pm


It is Show Day today, so here are some sheep (from Longford show last year).

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Ryeland ram (old English breed, prime lambs)


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October 3rd, 2014

Three objects, three museums. @ 02:56 pm

Three objects from three museums at three different levels (national, state, local) in three different states/territories.

Three objects that particularly interested me when I visited museums in the last twelve months

From National Museum of Australia Old New Land gallery:

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Two skeletons, the one at the back being the shorter ones. Its head blends into the background a bit so you have to look carefully. An interesting way to demonstrate the changes between the modern merino sheep and the earlier type.

The accompanying caption says:
In the early 19th century, Elizabeth Macarthur played a key role in importing and breeding merino sheep. Today, descendents of these sheep form a closed-flock at the Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute, near Sydney.

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September 6th, 2014

Beechworth @ 08:45 pm


Beechworth, in north-east Victoria, but I've been here before in 2009 so this is just a sort of overview of the town post, and then some bits and pieces later as I feel like it.

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Looking at the older post, reminds that on the first time I came here I was asked "Why go there?" and this time it was "Why go there again?" Same answer, of course: because it's there. But also, I keep visiting places and having a quick look around and thinking "One day I'll have to come back and have a proper look about". So the more I travel, the longer my list of places still to visit becomes. Silly :)

In 2009, I stayed 2 night in Beechworth but left first thing in the morning, with a 2 hour stop over in Benalla on the way back to Melbourne. So I wanted to spend a bit more time in both, and I also included two other places just seen from the coach window (there were no trains running in 2009) to make sure there was enough to make the trip worthwhile. Four nights. Four towns.

(It did occur to me in the days beforehand that maybe I should have made the trip longer, but by the time I got to the end, four days was quite enough thanks. One of these days I'll go on a trip that involves lots of sitting around and relaxing. Really.)

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September 1st, 2014

Power stations are cool @ 06:50 pm


Hydro Tasmania as one hundred years old, and as part of their celebrations, they're having open days at some of their stations. Trevallyn was open yesterday, so I went down for a look.

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August 31st, 2014

Cars & Bikes @ 07:35 pm


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This weekend the National Automobile Museum of Tasmania had a "Public Awareness Day" i.e. an open day where members of the public also bring along their vehicles. I went along on Saturday and took some photos but camera failed miserably at the inside photo things. Which is a pity because they have some very cool vehicles. Some of the not-so-bad photos below:

This first part has the older (pre-1910) cars. Then some motorcycles. Then a range of other interesting vehicles. Then outside.

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August 11th, 2014

Before we leave here... @ 09:19 pm

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See this photo? I took this photo, then went to retake it and nothing happened. No movement of lens. No sound of focusing. No shutter click.

*sniff*

(Firstly, I tried to buy a new battery. DSE don't sell them. Battery place doesn't either. "Too many different types, he said, and the capabilities of phone cameras now--" Bah. Camera far exceeded stupid phone camera.)

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I retook the same photo on little camera of weird photoness and crappy battery. It's not too bad with the streetscape thing. (And it is nice having a quiet, small camera, even if I kept losing it in my pocket.)
 

August 10th, 2014

Wangaratta cemetery @ 05:58 pm


OK I will do the cemetery. That way I can spend some time sorting and editing next batch of photos and now have to worry about getting them up tonight.

You can read or not, as you wish. (Although there might, or might not, be a reference back n later posts, depending on what I decided to show/writer about.) (Also, there might be a test at a the end.) As usual, I've included extracts from the Wangaratta Cemetery Self-guided Tour Brochure in italics.

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August 9th, 2014

Wangaratta, part II; which has the more interesting photos @ 07:19 pm


I'll leave these in the order they were taken, mostly, because there is no reason not to and moving them around is tedious and time consuming.


Art Deco Court House! I don't know why the idea of an Art Deco-style court house is so cool, but it is. Maybe because court houses are either usually elaborate older buildings or dull newer buildings. Maybe because the writing on the building is Art Deco too, which is just so non-court housey. Whatever the reason, it is a cool looking building.

The heritage walk brochure goes on about it in great lengths. It says Court House & Public Office: They were built in 1938 at a cost of £14,000. OK so maybe not great or lengths but it is included.

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August 8th, 2014

Wangaratta, part I @ 06:27 pm


Random choice gives Wangaratta as the topic of the first photo post. It was also the first stop on my trip, and the last.

(I caught the Sydney express train from Melbourne, and got off here to catch coach to Beechworth. This gave me over three clear hours to wander about the town and takes photos. Camera had over ideas :( This lead to much sadness and then purchase of a little red camera with automatic everything and some other annoying traits, and I had an hour or two of photo taking. Then on Friday, I intended to return here and catch express back to Melbourne but they were saying delays of up to 40 minutes due to track work, so I cancelled and instead booked an earlier (and cheaper) VLine service. When I asked the nice lady at the counter what would get me to Melbourne by 6.30 pm, she frowned at the timetable and said "There's the 1.42 but it's a coach". Due to trackwork, coaches were substituting for trains. But it would allow me to spend a few more hours wandering around taking photos and get to Melbourne in plenty of time for my plane. So I booked on the coach and was given a ticket saying 1.42 Coach. But when I turned up on Friday to get on the 1.42 Coach it was instead 1.42 Train. Which was good. But the point of that being, I spent a couple of hours in Wangaratta on both Monday and Friday.)

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Now to the photos, and I have split them into two posts. This one will be Murphy Street, some views of the streets and some of buildings along it, with notes from the heritage walk brochure the nice lady at the information centre gave me. The second post will be the other streets. I'm using the Heritage Walk Wangaratta brochure produced by the Wangaratta Regional Tourism Board, and I'll put bits from that in italics. These first paragraphs are a slightly rearranged version of their "Snapshot of Wangaratta's History".

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August 5th, 2014

War @ 07:58 pm

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As you've probably seen elsewhere, the fourth of August 1914 was the start of World War I (which was the 5th of August in Australia, which is today) and, as you;ve probably also seen, I've been doing a lot of related work at the museum. All right, that's all I've been doing for months? Years? Something like that.

I started with the photos from the Weekly Courier, a local weekly publication with full page photographic inserts in the middle, and spent some time transcribing a diary and one afternoon looking at photos of dead bodies in trenches*, but mostly recently I've been looking at service records, and reading them. These build a different story of the war to the usual ones. This story is made up from medical records, lists of promotion and transfers, letters from next of kin, medical records, disciplinary matters and requests for replacement medals/discharge papers. It is accounts of men in and out of hospital, dying of wounds soon after returning home, or decades later. GSW & shell shock** & gassing. It is letters from family asking for news when they haven't heard anything in a long time, or wanting the address of the hospital to write to, or enquiring about personal effects for a dead son while dealing with a seriously injured son, or waiving the claim of a bastard son's rights to medals (as next of kin) in favour of the soldier's father (but don't address these letters to the mother, as she doesn't know about the child), or trying to find the location of a grave Of men declared missing during August 1916 but the family having to wait months for the official KIA verdict, along with accounts of witnesses who had last seen them (being blown up by a shell, laying the ground seriously injured). The dead left there to be buried by shells. An NCO buried by his men in the cemetery of a nearby village.

Those who never made it out of (training) camp because they lied about their age. One such young man, whose two brothers had enlisted earlier, came back for a second try when he was old enough and was finally get sent over overseas, only to run up a string of AWLs. Pages of them. Even when he was finally sent home, he jumped ship in the US. Or the forty-four year old whose wife wrote a very long letter saying how hard he was finding it, how he really wanted to enlist and do his bit, but he was finding it very hard and he'd be forty-six in a few months... Or a young man from Warsaw, Russia who was discharged for being an enemy agent. He was actually from Bohemia, but he really hated the Germans and wanted to fight them, his letter said.

Recommendation for awards for gallantry, with accompanying descriptions. A major whose knee was injured when a plane fell into his tent. A captain blown up by a shell and twice covered by dirt, who was suffering from concussion and gassing. A young Duntroon graduate with a bright future killed in the Gallipoli landing. The three brothers, of whom only one came home. The major who shot himself on the transport home.

This is not the story you get through TV and films. It's a story about people doing what they did and how it affected them, and it contrasts so differently with the ra-ra dramatics you get on the screen (and in books and magazines) that I'm not sure I can watch them any more. It's a little depressing, with occasional light moments, but mostly it's fascinating and deep and I wish it would go away and leave me along.

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*This is not a good thing to do. Not at all. There are some fascinating WWI photos that are worth looking at. Maybe even spending a whole afternoon looking at, but not exclusively bodies in trenches.

**Which seems to have originally been used to describe the (not visible) injuries caused by a shell including hearing loss, but later developed the broader meaning, although I can't find a source to confirm this
 

August 3rd, 2014

A bit of trivia @ 04:53 pm

Last night we went to a trivia fundraising event, and it was a bit... odd.

Not the trivia event itself. I'd been to the same event last year and it was much the same. Eight rounds of 10 or 20 questions. Each team is given a paper with the questions on it and ~five minutes to write down their answers. They can buy an answer ($2) or clue ($1) each round. Usual sort of thing.

The first round was easy, a sort of warm up round, with facts and figures. (e.g. How many days in June? How many S's are there in the name of the world's longest river? Fred collects cigarettes ends to make into cigarettes for himself. 7 ends will make one cigarette. He has 49 ends. How many cigarettes can he make?) We got 10/10. As did most of the other teams.

Second round was names of women who have won Olympic gold medals, scrambled. Also not that hard for the most part, and we got 20/20. As did three of the other teams.

Third found, badly copied photos of people to identify. A bit harder, but we got 10/10. As did, um, no other teams.

Fourth round was Tasmania. Bit harder. (e.g How many columns outside the town hall? When did women get the vote? What were the names of Tasman's ships?) But 20/20 again.

Really. Quite odd.

I kept going up to the check the scoreboard at the front of the room, and each time, there was the perfect score. Not something that is likely to happen again -- you need just the right combination of topics & team members -- but fun.

(Round 6 we finally got two wrong (What is the name of the white semi-circle thing at the base of the the fingernails?) and also in the final round; but we'd obviously won by then.)

 

July 21st, 2014

3 @ 09:10 pm

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I seem to be juggling three new stories in my head: plots ideas and developments, character backgrounds, world building details and background research. Three. One is usually enough to keep me occupied.

#3 decided today that the characters needed names, and with that came their back stories. And I don't know anything about trains (well not enough to write about them) and even less about railway construction.

#2 at least just needs me to do some back-to-origins reading, and then I can make up the rest as I go (yay for SF).

#1, I am sure, is laughing at me, and I've forgotten their names. Also, police procedures 1820s-style?

Three. Gah.
 

July 20th, 2014

Hobart & Dark Mofo, from June @ 08:03 pm


Friday afternoon I caught the bus down to Hobart. I didn't see a point in getting up first thing in the morning to catch a bus when I didn't have to be there in the evening, and there was a Redline bus going down at lunch time. What I forgot was I don't like going to Hobart on Redline. Coming back is OK but going down I don't like. Anyway, I got down there after 5 pm and went to the Alabama Hotel to meet Joee.

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It's a new hotel. "Budget Boutique" is how they describe themselves, and they have pink flamingo lights in the stairwell.


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July 16th, 2014

Quiet @ 04:17 pm

Lack of posting here is due to much writing and reading. Which is good, although it does leave me with lots of things I want to do here. This week I'll do some.

 

June 23rd, 2014

Long Marsh grave @ 03:48 pm

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Just adding a bit extra to the entries about Long March Dam, the never completed, very abandoned dam and accompanying "settlement" in the middle of the bush that we visited in 2011.

There is a lonely bush grave, of a worker who was killed on site, Thomas Collins, aged 36. This is him. Looked him up to see if there was any (easy) way to find out who was working there, but if you ignore that rather large final entry, the only indication is a possible "L M" in the "Station of Gang" entry. The records of men on either side of him don't have this, so they weren't allocated on the basis of ship either. It might have been an interesting thing to follow up on :)
 

June 11th, 2014

Here. @ 06:16 pm

I need to post here more often.

The reasons for not doing so are not good. They might be valid, but they're not good.
The reason to do so*, is very good.

So, I need to post here more often.
Also, need new user icons.

*I like to go back and read them.

 

June 1st, 2014

Baby monkey being a baby monkey @ 06:33 pm

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The adult monkeys in City Park don't actually do a lot. Mostly they sit around and groom each other, the move to another spot and groom someone else. Occasionally they chase each other or swing on a rope or strip branches from a tree. So I was amused to catch this bit of action as I was leaving yesterday.

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There was a baby monkey (who I'll refer to as "he" for clarity) sitting on a rock doing typical baby monkey things i.e. picking things up from the rock and seeing if they're edible, when an adult female came along.

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Protest in the Park @ 04:46 pm

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Some photos from Protest in the Park in Princes Square yesterday. I wasn't feeling particularly enthusiastic so there are just some signs and crowd shots from the back. But rally there was, and attend and take photos I did.

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A Tree @ 04:15 pm


This is a tree in Princes Square with lovely branches. That is all :)

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May 2nd, 2014

Looking for Williamsford @ 07:15 pm


So back in January, I said "Just outside Rosebery this is a dirt road that runs off the south. There are number of signs at the turn off that point to "Williamsford 6 km", "Car Park 6 km", Montezuma Falls." Then went on to show photos of the abandoned mineral extraction plant site just up the road a bit. After leaving there, well it was only five more kilometres to Williamsford so the sensible thing to do is go find it.

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This area is a bit, well, uninhabited and has lots of trees. This photo and next one are taken from the car.


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Somewhere on the West Coast @ 05:01 pm


At Bastyon Dam on Lake Rosebery, as best I can tell. There's a photo with a location sign taken five minutes later.

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April 26th, 2014

Lots of Legos, 2014 @ 09:24 pm

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Some photos from Brixhibition 2014, at Kings Meadows High School. Bigger and better than last year.

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April 25th, 2014

From Luck's diary @ 08:49 am

A couple of entries from the diary I was transcribing (Mervyn Luck, a driver in the 3rd Field Artillery Brigade. 22 years old when he joined in August 1915.) The diary starts when he embarked in October 1914 through to June 1915. It's record of what he did he each day. Brief, to the point and not a lot of context.


Saturday 24 April
Left Lemnos for Dardunells at seven oc every body very excited in sight of land all day

Sunday 25 April
Got up at five about 30 war boats engaged all shooting 78 boats in sight getting our pontoon ready to land several wounded soldiers & sailors brought abord our boat 3 Bgde Infantry landed in morning about 700 casualtys areoplains flying over all day shoting ceased about dark We shifted our boat round the cape several Batterys of howitzers cant be loacated

Monday 26 April
War boats continue to shoot at six oc 1 Battery left our boat at 8 oc to land all the wounded taken off our boat to hospital ship Beautiful clear weather shooting continues until lights out

 

April 15th, 2014

Half-hearted photos of eclipse and some cool clouds @ 08:22 pm


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Moon is both dark and bright. Camera doesn't like this.


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April 10th, 2014

A Bit @ 07:40 pm

Found a notebook with a half a page written on, and that's a bit from a story I don't recognise:

Agent Theron took the bag & swung the other onto shoulder.
"You're right with that?"
He shrugged his other shoulder.
"I'm sorry, Ma?on. We're not used to having a senior agent."
"Investigator" she said "and I would hope. We only come when have a problem."
He went quiet for a few minutes.
"Have you been before?"
"Yes." 15 years ago, when she was fresh out of the Academy.

It's a bit hard to read in places. Don't know what it's from. It's in green so probably recent but the box I took it out of has, amongst other stuff:

uni notes from 1992 (gifted & special children)
catalogue for dog show 1994 (bitchy's first show, she got Best Baby Puppy Group 2 (Terriers)
Souvenir Guide to the Penny Royal Windmill, printed 1978
National Trust newsletter 2010
lots of stuff from Adult Ed writing classes, early 1990s
Sydney Olympics souvenir newspaper, 2000
Envelope from Sanitarium with reprint postcards, 1988
letter from Sam (Raymond Terrace), early 1990s
brochures from Maldon & Bendigo, 2010
Launceston City Council Calendar, 2012
JRTCA Newsletter 1994
TAFE notes, 2011
early notes and drafts for stories I'm currently submitting


So it could have come from another time!

 

March 25th, 2014

Plane! @ 10:09 pm


OK this is my coolest photo ever for this year. From the Weekly Courier (11/9/19)

Plane over Launceston

The Peace Loan aeroplane, previously introduced here, over Launceston.


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March 16th, 2014

Toy ads through time & that gender thing @ 08:49 pm

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There's been much talk lately about the gendering of children's toys and the marketing thereof. I was idly curious about how much division of the sexes occurred in early toy advertising so I wandered over and looked for some ads from a hundred years ago.

I searched in advertising with some key words (e.g. toys, dolls) and these are the first ads I came across for a toy shop or department (hence the number of regional publications). So no deliberate selection.

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The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate


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March 15th, 2014

Tour of Duty @ 08:36 pm

Some photos from Tony Robinson’s Tour of Duty at the QVMAG today. The focus of this episode is war militaria & story.

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Louise (Collectons Manager& Andrew (Librarian) and the nurse painting of unknown origin.


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March 10th, 2014

Murder & mayhem! Maybe. @ 06:44 pm

I think I'll write a murder mystery/police drama TV series:

Episode 1: A body is found in small town. Immediately afterwards every one in the town leaves because they know what happens next. Turns out to be have been a murder committed elsewhere but they just dumped the body there.

Episode 2: The body of a young man is found in the lake behind the hotel by a two kids fishing. No one knows who he is. Turns out to be a tourist who had too many drinks one night and mistook the jerry for a lakeside walkway.

Episode 3: New home owners digging in the garden of their new house find two bodies wrapped in sheets. Turn out to be canine.

Episode 4: The night after a bad storm an elderly woman is found dead at the bottom of the stairs and just outside the same town, a young woman is found dead in her car. Is there a connection? Turns out one fell down the stairs because the power was out during the storm and the other run off the road because she misjudged the corner in the rain.

Needs some more episodes, I think.

 

March 9th, 2014

T.M.E Site again @ 07:48 pm


Revisiting the west coat. In fact, revisiting a site that I posted photos for back in January because that is what we did, and we discovered the more interesting parts.

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So this is the lookout that I showed last time. The area was the site of a processing plant operated by the Tasmanian Metal Extraction Company (TME) in 1913/1914. This lookout is just off the Williamsford Road, and gives you a view over the site, but there's no access down to it.


However, if you leave turn off the main path just before the lookout and go around to the right and then around to the left, you eventually end up on the area below the lookout.

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March 7th, 2014

To Do List @ 03:09 pm

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Because it's a long weekend


  • At least two LJ posts*
  • Two posts on 432 pages**
  • Read some more of boring book from library
  • Make a start on Essay 1***
  • Read more of evil WIP, and try to finish
  • Glare at query for Seals



*One photos (TME II, Williamsford or non-bikes), one text
**Traction engine & something that's not new photos; consider encouraging sqrl involvement
***Start can mean copy a question to a Word doc and then save it in a relevant folder
 

February 5th, 2014

Zeehan @ 07:23 pm


This is Zeehan.

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There is something that fascinates me about this town, ever since my first visit ten years ago. We'd come through Tullah, and stopped at Rosbery for some photos. Then we're driving along the main street of Zeehan, which is rather long, but not unlike the other towns with miners cottages and the occasional hotel or small shop, until we get to--

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February 3rd, 2014

Beach @ 12:01 am

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We went to the beach today so I took some photos. They're only taken with the camera so they're nothing much but taken they were so here they are.

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January 27th, 2014

Rosebery @ 06:00 pm


This is Rosebery. It's story is that of every other mining town. Ore is discovered nearby, in this case gold and zinc, and a town is established.

Quite a township is springing up at the Rosebery. A commodious hotel, butcher's and baker's shops and store are already built. The population is 200.
The Mercury, 1897

Unlike many mining towns, Rosebery didn't have the boom/bust cycle. The current population now is 1000 people. In the middle of last century the population got up over 2000 but I don't think it ever got much either.

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South west along the main street. (That's Agnes St.)


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T.M.E Site @ 12:50 pm


Just outside Rosebery this is a dirt road that runs off the south. There are number of signs at the turn off that point to "Williamsford 6 km", "Car Park 6 km", Montezuma Falls. About one kilometre in though is a small car park and tower.

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"Track to T.M.E site".


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January 26th, 2014

Bars of soap, comparisons to @ 06:00 pm

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I blame my sister for this. She asked about the origin of the expression "they wouldn't know me from a bar of soap". I had a look. I discovered it's origin isn't that simple.

It is apparently addressed in a 2009 edition of OzWords, a newsletter from the Australian National Dictionary Centre. In answer to a letter they say:

The international expression that you allude to—not to know a person from Adam— was first recorded in 1784. The variant not to know a person (or something) from a bar of soap appears first in New Zealand in 1903: "Didn't know the game [of golf] from a bar of soap." It is next used in Australia, in 1918: "Don’t know ’im from a bar of soap." Thereafter it is widely used in both Australia and New Zealand, as in this passage from Kylie Tennant’s 1943 novel Ride on Stranger: "'Why doesn't she marry the child's father?' ... 'It’s my belief she doesn't know him from a bar of soap.'"

It is unlikely that hygiene was the issue that gave rise to the idiom. In this age of soaps that come in so many shapes, forms, smells, and colours, it is easy to forget that in earlier days all bars of soap looked much the same. One member of the Dictionary Centre commented: "it alludes to the anonymous nature of rectangular (yellow) bars of soap, produced by the indistinguishable thousands on production lines in factories. The allusion works well because it’s such a common commodity."


But they're wrong about the earliest date. The date matters because you need that to get some idea of where and how a phrase originated. Anyway, a quick trawl through the newspapers in Trove gives an occurrence in 1900 in a Queensland newspaper:

That the sentries at the gates to the Exhibition-ground, Brisbane, have their time fully occupied in preventing people swarming in to lines.
That, recently, a sentry called a would-be visitor to halt, and inquired his business. That the reply was, "I wish to see Sergeant Brown."
That the volunteer-man, after due consideration, answered: "Don't know Sergeant Brown from a bar of soap! You get-back !"
That, considering that the sentry was a powerful man, standing 6ft. in his socks, the would-be visitor got--quickly!


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